Camus and the dangers of Truth

[ 3/August/22 ]

Some truth in that – and in the context of the evolution of strategic systems that survive; there is a place for simplification of contexts under stress.

If there really are agents willing to kill you, then killing them first is a survival mechanism that will be strongly selected for.

There really have been many episodic contexts where that was/is a reality.

Evolution has not previously had to deal with the vast increase in sources of stress; it only had to deal previously with immediate stress from immediate threat.

The crossover effects of stress, from any source, to both the discrimination/distinction systems, and the more strategic levels of threat response systems; of our brains can be both subtle and profound.

So yeah – Camus saw something real, but I don’t think he really had any idea of what was actually creating the things he saw. It seems to be a sort of meta cognitive bias – a meta confirmation bias – that we are all subjectively, recursively, vulnerable to.

We are all necessarily more ignorant than we are informed, however informed we are. That is the great danger of notions like Truth.

There is so much power in the idea behind science, of eternal uncertainty, of eternally asking questions, testing, becoming less wrong over time, without ever expecting to become right – but so few actually engaged in science realise that is what they are supposed to be doing. Most go after some level of “Truth”, and get lost in the process – blinded.

It is really hard to retain uncertainty. REALLY HARD when stressed.

About Ted Howard NZ

Seems like I might be a cancer survivor. Thinking about the systemic incentives within the world we find ourselves in, and how we might adjust them to provide an environment that supports everyone (no exceptions) with reasonable security, tools, resources and degrees of freedom, and reasonable examples of the natural environment; and that is going to demand responsibility from all of us - see www.tedhowardnz.com/money
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